Look as You May, Enjoy You Will Not
Many people object to “wasting money in space” yet have no idea how much is actually spent on space exploration. The CSA’s budget, for instance, is less than the amount Canadians spend on Halloween candy every year, and most of it goes toward things like developing telecommunications satellites and radar systems to provide data for weather and air quality forecasts, environmental monitoring and climate change studies. Similarly, NASA’s budget is not spent in space but right here on Earth, where it’s invested in American businesses and universities, and where it also pays dividends, creating new jobs, new technologies and even whole new industries.
Chris Hadfield, An Astronaut’s Guide to Life on Earth (via femscinerd)

Fund science
Fund space

itsbrendafranco:

It takes 10 seconds out of your day, its that simple. Pray for Syria.

How about actually contributing? Prayer might make you feel better but it does NOTHING to solve ANYTHING.

sagansense:


“We live in a society exquisitely dependent upon science and technology, in which nobody understands science and technology…”
— Carl Sagan
Recommended: Carl Sagan’s CSICOP article “Why We Need To Understand Science”

sagansense:

We live in a society exquisitely dependent upon science and technology, in which nobody understands science and technology…

— Carl Sagan

Recommended: Carl Sagan’s CSICOP article “Why We Need To Understand Science

KeaneLM 2014

KeaneLM 2014

artandsciencejournal:

Food For Thought: Art is Good For Your Brain!

A recent study by University Hospital Erlangen in Germany suggests that, other than relieving stress, coming into contact with art specifically by making art works or crafts, can create “a significant improvement in psychological resilience”. This is due to the excessive use of motor and cognitive processing in the brain, stimulating it. Such discoveries are beneficial especially to the elderly, as creating art keeps the brain healthy, which could help slow down the onslaught of memory loss. You can read more on the findings here.

Science, engineering and all other typically ‘non-artsy’ fields have artistic elements about them; in fact, mathematical equations, DNA and even microbiological elements can be seen as works of art all on their own, serving both aesthetic and educational purposes. Even bacteria, manipulated by scientists such as Eshel Ben-Jacob, can create psychedelic patterns based on natural formations due to change in temperature or environment. The results are truly groovy.

A certain amount of creativity and a sense of design were definitely needed to create “inFORM”, an invention from MIT which allows users to interact with objects through a screen (yes, the digital kind). This invention is capable of rendering 3D objects physically, allowing users to interact with each other no matter how far away they are.

Not only can our artistic side create new inventions or help us see the scientific world in a different light, but art can help keep the brain active and healthy for many decades, or in the case of Hal Lasko, almost a century. The 99 year old, who passed away this year, worked as a typographer in his youth, making fonts by hand. After becoming partially blind in his senior years, Lasko turned to digital mediums such as Microsoft Paint, creating over 150 digital pieces.

Art it seems is a lot more beneficial to us than merely another creative outlet and stress-reliever, and we have science to thank for reaching that conclusion!

-Anna Paluch

Pissed off astronauts

retromantique:

Robin Wight 

Dandelions always remind me of Carl Sagan. I bet he’d have loved this.